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Inhabit

Humanity is more than ever threatened by its own actions; we hear a lot about the need to minimize footprints and to reduce our impact. But what if our footprints were beneficial? What if we could meet human needs while increasing the health and well-being of our planet? This is the premise behind permaculture: a design process based on the replication of patterns found in nature. INHABIT explores the many environmental issues facing us today and examines solutions that are being applied using the ecological design lens of permaculture. Focused mostly on the Northeastern and Midwestern regions of the United States, Inhabit provides an intimate look at permaculture peoples and practices ranging from rural, suburban, and urban landscapes.

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Burning Water

When the Lauridsen family of Valhalla Farm, near Rosebud, Alberta, discovers that the strange bubbles in the water it relies on for bathing, drinking and farming is full of chemicals—and that the tap water can be lit on fire —it begins a fight for the truth behind an unsettling phenomenon that has been occurring in towns across North America. BURNING WATER looks at the financial and social impact on one family whose prototypically Albertan dream of living off the land puts it at odds with the ideals of a “New West” where the land is dominated by oil and gas wells rather than herds of cattle, and the provincial government seems to favour energy royalties over the farmers.

Resources - Occupy Watch

Sources from other movements

Where FEMA Fell Short Occupy Sandy Was There – NYTimes, November 11, 2012

 

 

By  Published: November 9, 2012


ON Wednesday night, as a fierce northeaster bore down on the weather-beaten Rockaways, the relief groups with a noticeable presence on the battered Queens peninsula were these: the National Guard, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Police and Sanitation Departments — and Occupy Sandy, a do-it-yourself outfit recently established by Occupy Wall Street.

This stretch of the coast remained apocalyptic, with buildings burned like Dresden and ragged figures shuffling past the trash heaps. There was still no power, and parking lots were awash with ruined cars. On Wednesday morning, as the winds picked up and FEMA closed its office “due to weather,” an enclave of Occupiers was huddled in a storefront amid the devastation, handing out supplies and trying to make sure that those bombarded by last month’s storm stayed safe and warm and dry this time.

“Candles?” asked a dull-eyed woman arriving at the door.

“I’m sorry, but we’re out,” said Sofia Gallisa, a field coordinator who had been there for a week. Ms. Gallisa escorted the woman in, and someone gave her batteries for her flashlight. As she walked away, word arrived that a firehouse nearby was closing for the night; the firefighters there were hurrying their rigs to higher ground.

“It’s crazy,” Ms. Gallisa later said of the official response. “For a long time, we were the only people out here doing relief work.”

Read more: Where FEMA Fell Short Occupy Sandy Was There – NYTimes, November 11, 2012

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