"Very, very, very, very, very generous."

"Very, very, very, very, very generous." r1 ... View this e-mail in your browser. Calls for a clean energy transition, resounding in political conversations and street demonstrations around the globe right now, are a clear response to the growing climate emergency.

But they can also be seen as a threat to the small towns built up around resource extraction.

Increasingly, governments and policy makers discuss how climate gains can be made without leaving anyone behind. But what does that really mean for the communities designed around the needs of the fossil fuel industry, their fates now unforgivably intertwined?

The Narwhal visited two Alberta towns in the Municipal District of Greenview — which received more per capita in oil and gas payments than anywhere else in Alberta in 2018 — to learn from the people who benefit from and rely upon the industry revenues at stake in high-level climate conversations.

We've got lots for your reading pleasure this week.

Enjoy!

Emma Gilchrist
Editor-in-chief

‘Only reason we exist’: why an energy transition is hard to fathom in parts of Alberta

By Sharon J. Riley

From sprawling recreational multiplexes to sponsored sports teams to well-maintained roads, schools and seniors centres, Alberta’s Municipal District of Greenview is reaping the benefits of the region’s fracking boom. Read more.

‘Beyond what our instruments can tell us': merging Indigenous knowledge and Western science at the edge of the world

By Weronika Murray

Residents of remote Tuktoyaktuk — which may become the first community in Canada to relocate due to coastal erosion and sea level rise — are taking climate data gathering into their own hands. Read more.

Can deep sea mining be sustainable?

By Anna Metaxas and Verena Tunnicliffe

Canada’s aspiring goals of global environmental leadership beyond our own continental shelf should provide the incentive to ensure if deep-sea mining proceeds, it is in an environmentally sustainable manner. Read more.

Last call! The Narwhal's Indigenous journalism fellowship wants to hear from you! Deadline to submit applications is September 27. Please, share this around with all your pals!

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