Afghanistan was a smashing success — for defense contractors.

Defense stocks outperformed the stock market overall by 58 percent during the war in Afghanistan. Now, cable news commentators with their own undisclosed ties to the defense industry are castigating President Joe Biden’s withdrawal. The Intercept is reporting on the disastrous corruption of the military-industrial complex and the crises it creates in pursuit of profit.




Was the Afghanistan War a failure? Not for the top five defense contractors and their shareholders.

If you purchased $10,000 of stock evenly divided among America’s top five defense contractors on September 18, 2001 — the day President George W. Bush signed the Authorization for Use of Military Force in Afghanistan — and faithfully reinvested all dividends, it would now be worth $97,295.

In fact, defense stocks outperformed the stock market overall by 58 percent during the war in Afghanistan.

Now, cable news commentators with their own undisclosed... ties to the defense industry are castigating President Joe Biden’s withdrawal. The Intercept is reporting on the disastrous corruption of the military-industrial complex and the crises it creates in pursuit of profit.

As a nonprofit news outlet with no corporate backers and no advertising on our website, we depend on reader support to help make this critical journalism possible. Your donation today will keep our reporters on the beat, breaking stories about the dark underbelly of U.S. warmaking that would otherwise go untold.

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The U.S.’s 20-year war in Afghanistan mostly remained on the media’s back burner in recent years — until Biden’s withdrawal forced it back into the headlines.

But at The Intercept, we’ve been reporting on the war’s catastrophic consequences, which American military and political leaders have consistently hidden from the public. We’ve revealed the brutal civilian toll of remote drone killings and the ruthless tactics of local death squads backed by the U.S.

And we’ve shown who profits from the war machine, from mercenaries like Erik Prince to surveillance device manufacturers whose biometric tools may have fallen into the hands of the Taliban.

We’re going to keep digging into the hidden toll of the Afghanistan War and how Afghans will continue to pay the price — even if the pundits in Washington, D.C., look away after the withdrawal.

We need your support to stay on the beat. Can you donate today to help make The Intercept’s hard-hitting coverage of the war in Afghanistan and the military-industrial complex possible?

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The Intercept is an award-winning nonprofit news organization dedicated to holding the powerful accountable through fearless, adversarial journalism. Our in-depth investigations and unflinching analysis focus on surveillance, war, corruption, the environment, technology, criminal justice, the media and more. Email is an important way for us to communicate with The Intercept’s readers, but if you’d like to stop hearing from us, click here to r0 from all communications. Protecting freedom of the press has never been more important. Contribute now to support our independent journalism.

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