[Sjsall] upcoming opportunities and events

Dear Friends of SJS,

Equity and Human Rights is currently accepting nominations for the annual Provost’s Advocacy and Activism Award in Equity and Diversity. These awards recognizes the achievements of individuals or groups in the University community (current students, faculty, or staff, and alumni) who demonstrate dedication to the advancement of social equity through advocacy and/or activism. These awards also celebrate individuals or groups who go beyond the expectations of one’s job, position or responsibility to advance the rights of others.

The poster and nomination package have been attached to this email, and more information about the awards can be found on the Equity and Human Rights website.

Please distribute this note widely, and/or submit a nomination form to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The deadline for submission is January 18,... 2019.

Thank you,

Kamilla Milligan, PhD (Pronouns: she/her)

Manager, Equity and Diversity at UVic

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

250-472-4121

Visitor on the traditional territory of the WS'ANEC' (Saanich), Lkwungen (Songhees), Wyomilth (Esquimalt) peoples.

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Human Dimensions of Climate Change course

HDCC 300: Climate Change for Social Transformation

Course description

This course provides an opportunity for critical engagement with climate change as physical transformation, cultural object, and incitement to social transformation. Throughout, we will approach climate change as complex phenomena that are co-constituted by social, political, cultural and natural worlds. The course will introduce students to a variety of lenses, knowledge networks, constructed narratives and social justice issues that will help them understand that, while responding to climate change is a challenging task, it also opens our communities up for transformative change, justice and sustainability. The course is organized into three complementary sections:

An introduction to climate change and climate justice

Presently, anthropogenically caused changes in climate generate new significant risks for many human populations, such as Indigenous people, who have contributed very little in terms of greenhouse gas emissions. This calls for fairness and justice with regard to the distribution of harms, mitigation policies, and support for adaptation measures on all scales. We start with a brief overview of conceptual and factual matters. Next, we consider the practical and cultural impacts of climate change-induced deglaciation in the Andes for local populations as well as the extraordinary national constitutions of Ecuador and Bolivia that give standing to the natural systems. We conclude with a discussion of reasons for action among those most capable of climate change mitigation and remediation, and opportunities for social transformation in our own parts of the world. This will serve as a springboard for the following course sections.

Thomas Heyd, Ph.D., teaches in the Department of Philosophy and is Adjunct Assistant Professor in Environmental Studies. He helped create the Human Dimensions of Climate Change programme, taught HDCC 400 and contributed to HDCC 200, and primarily writes in environmental and climate ethics.

Political economy and ecology of fossil capitalism

This section examines issues associated with ‘fossil capitalism’ as a distinct way of life in global crisis. We begin with an overview of the crucial role of fossil fuels to capital accumulation and corporate control over workers and land, since the late 18th century. Next, we will address current issues of fossil fuel expansion and highlight social and political obstacles to the ‘decarbonisation’ of the energy system. Specific attention is given to the political and cultural influence of the carbon sector in Canada and globally. In counterpoint to these barriers, we will examine growing movements of resistance and opposition to fossil fuel expansion (such as the divestment movement), as well as varied and contending initiatives, policy frameworks and projects for a transition from fossil fuels to an economy based on renewable energy.

Nicolas Graham is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at UVic. He has taught in the areas of environmental sociology, social movements and social inequality. He is currently conducting research on just energy transitions, energy democracy and the power of Canada’s carbon extractive industry.

Political Ecology, climate disruption and our collective responses in the “Anthropocene”

The Anthropocene in the 21st century is an age of volatile changes in the environmental well-being of many human and non-human communities. Increasingly, communities, scientists and governments have found themselves involved in work that seeks to evaluate and mitigate the emerging effects of these human-caused ecological changes and disasters. But who stands to benefit from and whose well-being is left out of adaptation and mitigation efforts? Whose voices are at the table or silenced in discussions around sustainability, resiliency and recovery? With an introduction of the critical lenses in the political ecology, social movement theory and environmental justice literature, we will explore regional and globally-situated case studies of climate disruption and ask these questions of equity, justice and participation, centering a framework that recognizes that human systems never operate apolitically. Examining these case studies, we will explore how environmental harms are not equally distributed and already vulnerable communities are often disproportionately impacted. We will probe our own roles as community members and concerned citizens, learning what we can each do and do better, as we dive into the complex political realities that often affect the ability of communities, governments and organizations to respond to these challenges equitably.

Matt Fuller is a PhD candidate in Critical Geography and Political Ecology at UVic. He has a Masters in Environmental Studies and B.A. in social movement theory and media justice from the Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. His research focus is on environmental and climate justice, especially pertaining to how Indigenous and other frontline communities resist and respond to the harmful presence of fossil fuel megaprojects in their own backyards. Matt has spent 20 years as a community organizer, activist and musician in the US and has been arrested organizing at many local and national protests, including the 2014 People’s Climate March in NYC and in 2015 for locking himself to the anchor chain of a Shell Oil ship during the PNW resistance to Arctic drilling.

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Nov. 30:

Café Simpatico presents...

The Zapatista Movement in Chiapas

"¡Zapata vive, la lucha sigue!"

(Zapata lives, the struggle continues!)

In 1994, the day the NAFTA agreement became operational, threatening the survival of Mexican campesinos, the Zapatista National Liberation Army staged a 12-day-long uprising. Mexican society shook to its core.

After 24 years of resistance, the Zapatistas remain well organized and continue to protect their Indigenous culture, their right to land and their autonomy.

Presented by:

Gabriela Wieland McBee, University of Victoria

Professor in Humanities and Hispanic & Italian Studies

Music by:

Héctor Vazquez, classical musician from Mexico and PhD candidate at UVic

Café Simpatico

1923 Fernwood Road

Friday, November 30

Doors open at 7:00 pm

Music at 7:30 pm

Presentation at 8:00 pm

Admission by donation

Refreshments served

Nicaraguan Fair Trade Organic Coffee for sale

Sponsored by: Victoria Central America Support Committee

www.facebook.com/vcasc www.victoriacasc.org/

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Nov. 30:

CBC Documentary: Meet Guatemalans Angelica Choc, German Chub & others, taking Canadian mining company Hudbay Minerals to court

https://mailchi.mp/rightsaction/cbc-documentary-meet-guatemalans-angelica-choc-german-chub-others-taking-canadian-mining-company-hudbay-minerals-to-court

"With operations that span several countries, large multinational corporations, such as mining and extraction companies, can act with impunity, without state oversight or the control of international human rights mechanisms. As of 2013, more than 50 per cent of the world’s publically listed exploration and mining companies were headquartered in Canada. Many have been accused of engaging in conduct they could never get away with in Canada, exploiting weak or corrupt governments and legal systems in foreign countries that turn a blind eye to their operations."

Refugee caravans: Understand better why 10s of 1000s of Guatemalans and Hondurans are forced to flee their countries, year after year, in caravans or separately, due to the violent, corrupted economic model dominated, in part, by global mining and extractive industries

Airing: Friday, November 30 at 9 p.m. (9:30 NT) on CBC, the CBC TV streaming app, and https://watch.cbc.ca/. Repeating on News Network Sunday, December 2nd at 8 p.m. ET/PT, and Thursday, December 6th at 10 p.m. ET/PT

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“Meet the Guatemalan villagers taking a Canadian mining company to court”

https://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/guatemalan-villagers-suing-canadian-mining?fbclid=IwAR3u5mH7u9FmwRUQJVn-x-Rmffo6zuCrQMcels9jCW8Aj43qaTQY7GwpXrg

Since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted in 1948, the growing global economy has created new challenges. With operations that can span several different countries, large multinational corporations, such as mining and extraction companies, can act with impunity, without state oversight or the control of international human rights mechanisms. As of 2013, more than 50 per cent of the world’s publically listed exploration and mining companies were headquartered in Canada. Many of those companies have been accused of being irresponsible, engaging in conduct they could never get away with in Canada, exploiting weak or corrupt governments and legal systems in foreign countries that turn a blind eye to their operations.

In 2009, Adolfo Ich, a Mayan Q’eqchi’ community leader, was shot dead by a security guard employed at the Fenix nickel mine in El Estor, Guatemala. Adolfo was seeking to calm the community during a protest on contested land with the mine. A bystander at the protest, German Chub, was also shot by the same security guard and left for dead. He is now a paraplegic. Chub, along with Adolfo’s widow Angelica, took the mine’s security guard to Guatemalan courts, but the case was thrown out. Angelica was even charged with obstruction of justice.

Hope for change

In the CBC Docs Special Presentation “In Search of a Perfect World”, we meet Canadian lawyer Murray Klippenstein, who is using domestic law to champion international human rights. He managed to convince an Ontario Court to let the Guatemalans, including Angelica and German, sue the mining company here, in Canada.

“Mining companies kind of lived in this world where we go to another country far away, where the courts are corrupt, and that they could get away with things. But that’s not the case anymore,” says Klippenstein. He hopes this landmark case sends shockwaves through the boardrooms of Canada, “What happened in Guatemala is what you did. You did it from here in Toronto. And so you have to be accountable here.”

For more on this story, including former CBC correspondent Peter Mansbridge’s interviews with the Guatemalan villagers, watch “In Search of a Perfect World”

Airing: Friday, November 30 at 9 p.m. (9:30 NT) on CBC, the CBC TV streaming app, and https://watch.cbc.ca/. Repeating on News Network Sunday, December 2nd at 8 p.m. ET/PT, and Thursday, December 6th at 10 p.m. ET/PT

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Refugee Caravans

As this CBC documentary airs, 10s of 1000s of mainly Hondurans and Guatemalans are fleeing, in refugee caravans or separately, while Canadian. U.S. and other countries continue press hard for the expansion of the mining and extractive industries in Honduras, Guatemala and beyond.

Background – Hudbay Minerals lawsuits

“Is justice possible in Canada or Guatemala for Hudbay Minerals mining repression in Guatemala?”

By Grahame Russell, October 29, 2018

https://mailchi.mp/rightsaction/is-justice-possible-in-canada-or-guatemala-for-hudbay-minerals-mining-repression-in-guatemala

Tax-deductible donations (U.S. and Canada)

To support Angelica & German in their lawsuits in Canada, and a parallel criminal trial in Guatemala, and to support community-based groups in Honduras and Guatemala fighting for human rights and justice, the environment and territories, make check to "Rights Action" and mail to:

• U.S.: Box 50887, Washington DC, 20091-0887

• Canada: (Box 552) 351 Queen St. E, Toronto ON, M5A-1T8

Credit-Card Donations: http://rightsaction.org/donate/

Donations of stock? Write to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(Contributions can be made anonymously)

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Please re-post & publish this information

More information: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., www.rightsaction.org

Subscribe e-Newsletter: www.rightsaction.org

FB: www.facebook.com/RightsAction.org

TW: @RightsAction

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Dec. 12:

The Corporate Mapping Project, CCPA-BC, University of Victoria, Sierra Club of BC and The Narwhal are pleased to present:

The Big Stall: How Big Oil and think tanks are blocking action on climate change - a public talk and book launch with Donald Gutstein

When: December 12 - 7-9 PM

Where: Legacy Art Gallery Downtown (630 Yates Street, Victoria)

In fall 2015, the newly elected Trudeau government endorsed the Paris Agreement and promised to tackle global warming. In 2016, it released a major report which set out a national energy strategy embracing clean growth, technological innovation and carbon pricing. Rather than putting in place tough measures to achieve the Paris targets, however, the government reframed global warming as a market opportunity for Canada's clean technology sector.

The Big Stall traces the origins of the government's climate change plan back to the energy sector itself — in particular Big Oil. It shows how, in the last fifteen years, Big Oil has infiltrated provincial and federal governments, academia, media and the non-profit sector to sway government and public opinion on the realities of climate change and what needs to be done about it.

Working both behind the scenes and in high-profile networks, Canada's energy companies moved the debate away from discussion of the measures required to create a zero-carbon world and towards market-based solutions that will cut carbon dioxide emissions — but not enough to prevent severe climate impacts.

Join us in a talk with Donald Gutstein, Caitlyn Vernon (Sierra Club of BC), and William Carroll (Sociology, University; Corporate Mapping Project Co-Director) about why the door has been left wide open for oil companies to determine their own futures in Canada, and to offer the background information citizens need to challenge politicians claiming they are taking meaningful action on global warming.

This is a free event but space is limited, so please register to reserve your spot.

About Donald Gutstein

DONALD GUTSTEIN is a former professor in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University and co-director of NewsWatch Canada, a media-monitoring project at the school. He is also a research collaborator with the Corporate Mapping Project (www.corporatemapping.ca). He is the author of Harperism: How Stephen Harper and his think tank colleagues have transformed Canada as well as four other books on the links between large corporations, politics and the media.

This event is sponsored by: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - BC, Corporate Mapping Project, University of Victoria, Sierra Club of BC and The Narwhal

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Margo L. Matwychuk, PhD

Director, Social Justice Studies

c/o Dept of Anthropology

University of Victoria

PO Box 1700, STN CSC

Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2

Office: Cornett B210

PH: (250) 721-6283

FAX: (250) 721-6215

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it."> This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

http://web.uvic.ca/socialjustice/

We acknowledge and respect the Songhees, Esquimalt and WSÁNEĆ peoples on whose unceded territory the university stands and whose relationships with the land continue to this day.

You have received this email because you signed up for the UVic Social Justice Studies email list. To be removed, send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with "REMOVE" in the subject line.

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